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Dog Training – Agility, Conformation, Obediences and More! – Dog Groups.com http://www.doggroups.com All Dog Breeds Welcome! Sun, 08 Jan 2012 17:10:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Just another WordPress weblog No No Stop Your Dog Barking http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/stop-your-dog-barking/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/stop-your-dog-barking/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:17:14 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=156 Most dog owners have something in common, how to control barking. This article outlines steps to assist dog owners in correcting excessive barking.

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Most dog owners have something in common, how to control barking. This article outlines steps to assist dog owners in correcting excessive barking.

Barking at night

The simple answer is to ignore the dog. By barking, it is training you to respond. You might have a few noisy nights but you will be showing it that barking is not productive. Certainly do not respond by shouting or scolding. If you do so the dog will only know that its barking has been productive by making you bark as well.

Barking, excessive

The reason for excessive barking in one word is FEAR, and it is frightened because it has not been socialized. It is nervous of every sound it hears and barks in a futile attempt to send the perceived threat away. Sometimes a dog which constantly whines, cries, barks, or is destructive, suffers from skin problems brought about by scratching and licking themselves because of the stress of being left. Generally this is not a problem with dogs which have been socialized through training classes at an early age. The solution is socialzation through obedience classes and home management.

Barking when the owner is out

This is a big problem caused by bad owners. The dog is a pack animal and if, as a member of the family pack, it is given the freedom of the home by being allowed to rest on the furniture and sleep in bedrooms, then it will suffer a form of stress when the pack goes off to work because it expects to go with the pack. When people leave home they should not look, touch or talk to the dog for about 10 minutes beforehand. The same applies when coming home: ignore, no talking, no patting, no looking, nothing. This way, the dog understands that its barking has not brought the owner back. If it has been barking while you were away and is rewarded by your attention when you come back, it then thinks it was its barking that brought you back to the house. A dog’s bark is said to be worse than its bite. It certainly is for the neighbors of a constantly barking dog left alone for too long, unsocialized and with uncaring owners. Hopefully no readers would permit their dogs to be such a community nuisance.

Barking at the postman

The postman or any kind of regular deliveryman is regarded by your dog as an intruder and so it barks and is immediately rewarded by the postman going away. It thinks it has frightened off the intruder and done its duty. Talk to your postman and try to get him to cooperate. Tell him you will leave a tit-bit outside the door and ask him to push it through the letter-box before the letters. The tit-bit will be a better reward for your dog than chasing the postman away.

Barking when the telephone rings

If you shout (bark) at your dog when it barks at the telephone ringing, you are encouraging it to bark more. It feels there is danger if you react. Get a friend to phone you at several agreed times. When the phone rings do not move and do not speak. After your friend has done this a few times your dog will no longer bark when the telephone rings.

Barking from balconies

When a dog barks from a balcony at someone passing by, it is simply asserting its dominance, firstly by looking down on humans and secondly by successfully telling them to shove off. As far as the dog is concerned, it is objecting to someone invading its territory. And even more pleasing, its barking is rewarded by the passerby walking away. Answer: ban the dog from the balcony.

Barking deterrent

Abistop is a French invention resulting from chemosensory research into the dog barking problem. It is attached to the dog´s collar and automatically emits a small spray of citronella whenever the dog barks. Brief exposure to cintronella immediately distracts dogs but does not cause them distress and even smells pleasant to humans. It is effective but expensive at £90. A cheaper method might be a quick squirt of water from a plant spray bottle or putting a bit of food in front of the dog’s nose. It cannot eat and bark at the same time.

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New Baby and the Family Dog http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/new-baby-and-the-family-dog/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/new-baby-and-the-family-dog/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:16:00 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=154 I always advise that as soon as you are aware that there will be a new baby in the house, begin to prepare your family dog. Do not leave it until the new baby arrives. It is important that your dog associates the new baby with as few disruptions as possible.

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I always advise that as soon as you are aware that there will be a new baby in the house, begin to prepare your family dog. Do not leave it until the new baby arrives. It is important that your dog associates the new baby with as few disruptions as possible.

It is essential to ensure that your dog has a basic understanding of good behaviour. The dog should be able to lie quietly for short periods, not jumping up, walking on a lead without pulling and coming when called are all essential.

Most dogs are used to being the “baby” in the family and may find it difficult losing this position. Get your dog used to being ignored and left alone for short periods of time every day. If it is your intention to exclude your dog from certain areas of the house after the baby arrives, establish these rules well in advance to the baby’s arrival. Ideally, the dog should be excluded from the baby’s bedroom.

It is a good idea to teach your dog to walk gently next to the pram, but never tying the leash to the pram, and never when unattended. The dog should also be accustomed to new items of furniture such as playpens, carry cots and high chairs before baby arrives. If possible get a tape recording of baby noises and play it in a tape recorder placed where the baby will normally be so the dog becomes socialized to these sounds. Also teach the dog the difference between his/her toys and the baby’s toys.

Make sure that you develop a routine and stick to it when the baby arrives. It is important that the dog receives sufficient mental and physical stimulation. Try not to make a big deal with the dog about the arrival of the baby. Teach the dog how to approach the baby properly and gently. Allow the dog to make initial investigations and approaches.

Associate the baby’s presence with positive things. Give the dog titbits and lavish praise for desired behaviour around the baby. Do not place the baby on the floor with the dog and never shout at or hit your dog for approaching the baby incorrectly. Gently show the dog what you wish him/her to do and offer a reward for responding.

Due to the fact the a baby’s immune system is not strong, ensure that your dog is healthy and is up to date with worming and vaccinations before baby arrives.

If your dog has any behavioural problems, make sure that you resolve these before baby arrives or if you are in doubt about your dogs behaviour after your baby arrives, consult your vet who can refer you to a local animal behaviour counselor.

NEVER leave any baby or child unattended with any dog.

Of course all the above rules must also apply when Grandchildren or visitors come over here for a few weeks, where dogs are not used to being or living with children.

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Stop Your Dog From Jumping http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/stop-your-dog-from-jumping/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/stop-your-dog-from-jumping/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:14:56 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=152 Many dog owners face the problem of training their dog not to jump up on other pets and people. This article explains steps that can be taken to break your dog of the jumping habit.

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Many dog owners face the problem of training their dog not to jump up on other pets and people. This article explains steps that can be taken to break your dog of the jumping habit.

Recently a man wrote to me about his dog jumping up and I produce part of the letter and my reply:

“I have been doing the off command as a dog trainer told me since he was small and kneed him in the chest all to no avail. I have put him on his leash with choke collar and he is still tugging away. I use the sit command and eventually he calms down enough but that initial greeting is a horror story every time. It has become very frustrating and obviously not pleasant for others. I’ll just keep trying.”

Give up it will not work. The knee in the chest is so outdated and in my opinion bad advice to ask any pet owner to knee his dog. Pet owners have enough emotional problems and like you give up.

If a dog is jumping up,most pet dog owners will have all hell trying to get a dog to sit. Lets get it right, sorry for being blunt but I shoot from the hip! Most people have never bothered to attend a training school, read a book and now expect to train a dog by letter, well I do not think it can be done.

Dogs react to a trigger like a doorbell for excitement, it is an arrrival of another member of the pack, I must jump to show I am the host. With jumping dogs I like to consider removing excitable triggers. The front door bell rings, before opening the door I put away the dog. I am the host not the dog, this raises my status and reduces the dogs.

I bring my guests in. To me my dogs are not big, to me my dogs do not smell, to others they are big, they smell. I also advise my pet owners that what is acceptable to me is not always acceptable to my friends. It is a good idea to remove all excitability when entering your own home. Try walking in without looking, touching or talking for 5 minutes. After 5 minutes then talk and love you dog. This has removed the excitability trigger.

For dogs that jump up we have to think that a dog will do what is rewarding, if its good he does it, if it is not good he does not do it. Simple as that.

When a dog jumps up, do not be aggressive and knee, simply hold him up by his front paws and in a loving voice tell him you love him. He has jumped up so you react by holding him up. Do not let him down, keep him up as long as you can. By keeping him up, I mean stretching him up, and up and keep talking. He will then start to mouth your hands, then and only then drop him down. Do not place him, drop him.

When he is on all four legs which God gave him, love him to bits, cuddle and talk. Then encourage him to jump again, he might well try, as soon as he does grab the paws and repeat the whole exercise.

It is important to get the timing right, it is important that the whole family learn. Your dog will learn in a few minutes that to jump will make you react and he will not find this rewarding.

Its easy, simple and kind..

Commitment, Firmness, but kindness.

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Dog Agility for Fun http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-agility-for-fun/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-agility-for-fun/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:13:40 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=150 Agility most of you have seen on the Television. This is where dogs run through tunnels and go over jumps and weave in and around poles. This article outlines background information on preparing to compete in agility competition.

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Agility most of you have seen on the Television. This is where dogs run through tunnels and go over jumps and weave in and around poles. This article outlines background information on preparing to compete in agility competition.

What can you expect to see?

Jumps, hurdles, long jumps, weaving poles and a three metre ‘A’ frame. No agility course would be complete without the tyre hoop, the famous tunnel and see saw. The equipment has been imported from the UK and is made to the highest safety standard and to Kennel Club Specification.

Can any dog do this?

Yes and all breeds and sizes provided the dog does not have a physical disability, such as hip displasia, and is not overweight. It is not fair to jump a fat dog. If you have any doubt about the fitness of your dog then seek advice from your vet.

Is there an age limit for the dog or owner?

Children are most welcome to bring their pets. There is no age limit for dogs and pups are encouraged for the tunnel work, see-saw and dog walk plank. Of course heelwork, sit, down stays, send- away is part of the lessons as is walking the dog off leash on the left or right.

Equipment for Dog and Handler

The most important thing is good footwear, shoes that you can run in and have a good grip. (Not like Ivy’s shprawnzy shoes) Also wear clothes you can run in comfortably. For the dog although an ordinary check collar or half check are both good for heelwork practice, these are not suitable for agility. The correct collar is a leather or webbed buckle collar. Leads should be fairly long and made of leather, nylon or rope, not of chain, which can get caught up in the jumps.

What can we expect in the first lesson?

The first contact obstacle will be the Scale or ‘A’ Frame and is best for the beginner dog, although many handlers will not believe this when they see that the height is 2 metres. The width is wide and is a lot more formidable looking than a dog walk plank, which is also excellent for training the beginner dog. Many low jumps and of course the tunnel which all dogs love so much, that the problem can be keeping them out of the tunnel when they should be doing another obstacle. Young dogs take to the tunnel in minutes.

Control training

This is needed to get from one obstacle to another and as the young dogs progress we start to teach different commands to turn the dog to the left and right. A very important exercise for any dog is the ‘down’ and the wait. In agility training the recall follows from the wait and later on we teach the recall over obstacles. Another important exercise is the ‘send away’ to send the dog ahead of the handler. An easy way to teach the dog the send away is to hold your dog and get someone to put his food on one side of the room, then send the dog to his food from increasing distances away. Also practise send – aways to titbits and toys, having a great game afterwards. It is also an idea when a pup or young dog is doing instant down, to sometimes finish the send-away by downing the dog. Always remembering to give lots of praise.

You and your dog can have fun with agility if it is timed correctly and provided you and your dog are ready to progress. In my opinion it is important to remember that a dog that is happy and enjoying himself, is much more likely to try hard to please his owner, than one who is afraid he is going to get told off for making a mistake.

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Training a Dog to Stand http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/training-a-dog-to-stand/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/training-a-dog-to-stand/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:12:24 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=148 The first command most puppies that will enter the show ring learns is “Stand”. This command is an excellent exercise with small pups that are capable of learning and desire the mental stimulation. It also helps owners get to know the qualities of the pup better.

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The first command most puppies that will enter the show ring learns is “Stand”. This command is an excellent exercise with small pups that are capable of learning and desire the mental stimulation. It also helps owners get to know the qualities of the pup better.

The first step to teaching the pup to stand correctly is to place the front legs under the body of the pup. The legs should be straight and a consistent command should be given (i.e. Stand or Place). Once this is done the pup is rewarded. In no time at all, the pup will know what the command means and that it will be rewarded for doing it.

After the basic position is down the pup can be taught to stand with its back leg extended out. Once the pup is in its stand position, move its leg back while holding the chin up with your other hand. When the back leg is placed give the command you prefer to use for this movement (i.e. leg back). Once the pup is in position reward it for a job well done and continue training as with the stand command.

Once the pup has mastered the Stand and Leg Back commands it is time to move further. When the pup gets in proper position tell the puppy to stay and wait a few seconds before rewarding. As the pup becomes more accustomed to waiting, increase the time it waits. After the pup has waited tell it to “Release” and praise it and give it a treat.

This is an excellent beginning exercise to do with young pups that really helps the new owner get to know their pup and teach it discipline in a rewarding manner.

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Dog Musical Freestyle http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-musical-freestyle/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-musical-freestyle/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:11:21 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=146 This new dog sport is fun to watch and participate in. All you need to practice is your dog, some music and a little rhythm. Due to the great entertainment value, music freestyle has changed the way we view dog competitions and increased interest from dog owners of all breeds.

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This new dog sport is fun to watch and participate in. All you need to practice is your dog, some music and a little rhythm. Due to the great entertainment value, music freestyle has changed the way we view dog competitions and increased interest from dog owners of all breeds.

Freestyle roots originally started with horses where the horse would turn in sync with music. The beginning of dog freestyle can be traced to Canada and is believed to have started as a simple demonstration. Canine freestyle differs from the original freestyle form for horses in that it involves a series of rapid and complex maneuvers by the dog and owner.

The routines themselves are as original as the individual owners and dogs competing. Most participate using costumes to enhance the performance and routines are very well choreographed and planned out. Some routines can take several months to develop even with a well-trained dog.

There are several classes of freestyle including on lead, off lead, single dog and owner and multi-dog owner combinations. Although to be a top performer a lot of work is involved but this should not deter new competitors from competing. All that is really needed is a little time and an enthusiastic dog, it does not hurt for the owner to not mind dancing in front of a crowd either!

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Dog Treats and Training http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-treats-and-training/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-treats-and-training/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:09:59 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=144 Your best friend when beginning training your dog will most likely be treats. Treats are an excellent way to start a training program and serve many purposes. A treat helps keep your dogs attention and is a great way to reward your pup. Although treats are effective, your goal when training should be for the dog to follow commands without the treat as you will not have one at all times.

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Your best friend when beginning training your dog will most likely be treats. Treats are an excellent way to start a training program and serve many purposes. A treat helps keep your dogs attention and is a great way to reward your pup. Although treats are effective, your goal when training should be for the dog to follow commands without the treat as you will not have one at all times.

Types of Treats for Training

The treats used for training varies and is totally dependent upon the owners preference. Although many different items can be used, there are some common themes in treat selection one should follow for training. The main thing to keep in mind is choosing a treat that is small in proportion. A dog should not be given a whole dog bone or something similar each time it follows a command. This would cause the dog to become full and lose interest in training. In addition, it could quickly add unwanted weight to the dog, which could lead to health problems later.

A good choice for a treat is a piece of high quality kibble. Often a different type is used for training that varies from everyday food, so the dog feels it is getting something special for a job well done. Any name brand of high quality is recommended.

When to Treat

When starting the program you will want to treat the dog each time it performs a command. In addition to the treat, the dog should be praised when it does correctly. The timing of the praise and treating is of the up most importance. If you praise at the wrong time, the dog will think it is getting rewarded for another behavior and it causes confusion.

Weaning Off Treats

Although treats are a great way to start training, a program that continues treat will not have good long-term results. Once the dog begins to know what to do, gradually begin stop the treats from time to time and follow only with praise. After time passes and the dog becomes accustomed to your commands, stop the treats and only praise. This is so important because treats will not always be readily available when you need your dog to listen.

Additional Resources

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The First Step to Obedience Training http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/first-step-to-obedience-training/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/first-step-to-obedience-training/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:08:51 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=142 The first command and one of the hardest for a new puppy to learn is the “Watch Me” command. This should be taught before any of the other basic obedience training commands is started. The “Watch Me” command is used to get the dogs attention.

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The first command and one of the hardest for a new puppy to learn is the “Watch Me” command. This should be taught before any of the other basic obedience training commands is started. The “Watch Me” command is used to get the dogs attention.

The reason the “Watch Me” command is so important in a training program is because if an owner does not have the dogs attention, how is it going to listen? This is a very difficult command because puppies tend to want to play and listen when they prefer. By teaching this command, your dog will learn that you need its attention when told.

The first step for teaching this command is to start the pup playing. What you play is not important, the main thing is to get the puppy paying attention to playing and not you. While playing take a treat with a strong smell, such as a cutup hotdog, and wave it in front of the pups face. This will get the puppies attention immediately. Once the pup is interested move the treat to under your chin and say “Watch Me”. Wait until the puppy looks at you in the eyes then praise it and give it the treat.

As the puppy begins to learn to follow the treat and has a general idea it should look at you when you say “Watch Me” then the training should be taken to the next level. While playing with the puppy, place the treat at your nose and say the “Watch Me” command. Wait for the pup to look and then treat. After a little while of this the puppy will begin to recognize the command.

Finally begin to wean the pup from the treats and simply praise them for looking when commanded. In no time at all you will be able to have your pups attention, no mater what it is doing. Remember that different dogs learn at different rates and to keep training sessions short. The most important thing is for you and your pup to be having a great time with each other.

Additional Resources

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House Training Your Dog or Puppy http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/house-training-your-dog-or-puppy/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/house-training-your-dog-or-puppy/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:06:39 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=140 One of the first and most important training steps any new dog owner makes is training the dog or pup to relieve itself outside. With a little patience and repetition you can have your dog going potty outside in no time.

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One of the first and most important training steps any new dog owner makes is training the dog or pup to relieve itself outside. With a little patience and repetition you can have your dog going potty outside in no time.

The first step in a successful housebreaking training program is to have a plan. Hopefully before a dog or puppy is brought home it has been discussed who will take the pup outside and what method will be used. If you did not plan ahead, do not worry because it is never to late to start planning. Below are some tips to consider:

Who will get up during the night to take the dog out?

I prefer to alternate nights if more than one person owns the puppy.

Will a crate be used?

I would recommend a crate for housebreaking and other reasons. If used properly a crate can provide the dog a comfort area to feel safe and keep your valuables safe while you are away.

Will the pup be on a leash, if so who will take it out and wait for it to go to the bathroom?

At first it will take time for a new pup to get on a schedule with you so additional time will be needed. It is important to discuss what time the pup will be taken out and who will take it out ahead of time to avoid future frustration.

Consistency

One of the best methods for getting your pup to go outside is consistency. Each time the dog is taken outside to use the bathroom, go to the same area. This will help the puppy learn that this is where it should go to the bathroom and when you go to that area it is time to go to the bathroom.

To remember where the spot a rope laid on the ground in the shape of a circle can be used. This will help you and the pup remember where it is suppose to go. Leaving some of the dog’s stool in the area has also seen success and when it comes back ad smells it a trigger will happen and the dog will feel the need to use the bathroom.

Potty Command

Believe it or not dogs can be taught a command to use the bathroom. No, they will not go on command anytime but will go when it is time. The Potty Command is very useful for puppies because they have short attention spans. By using a consistent command at potty time, the pup will stay focused and go quicker.

Scheduling

Just like humans, dogs are creatures of habit and learn scheduling quickly. By taking your pup out at the same time each day, it will quickly learn and know when it is time to go to the bathroom. The best times are when the pup first wakes up, after eating, when you come home and before bedtime. A new pup will need to go about every 2 hours at first. As the pup gets older its bladder will also grow and the frequency it needs to relieve itself will decrease. One note of cautious is that if you miss a time the dog will let you know!

Praise and Reward

The main ingredient in the training program is the praise and reward stage. Just as with humans, dogs love praise for a job well done. Usually start off with treats followed immediately after the bathroom is used and praise the pup. This will teach the dog it is doing right and it will want to go outside to get rewarded. After a month or so, reduce the treats and simply praise the pup for a job well done.

Crating

A great resource for potty training is the crate. By placing the dog in a crate it creates a safe environment for it and will help it learn to wait before relieving itself. When choosing a crate the size is of the up most important. A crate too large will allow the pup to use the bathroom in half and sleep in the other. You also will not want a crate too small to where the dog cannot move around much. Dogs are like humans and do not want to sleep where they relieve themselves and thus will wait to be let outside. This is an invaluable tool for assisting your dog to learn to wait to use the bathroom.

Additional Resources

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Dog Aggression Problems http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-aggression-problems/ http://www.doggroups.com/dog-training/dog-aggression-problems/#respond Fri, 19 Feb 2010 04:05:22 +0000 http://www.doggroups.com/?p=138 Many owners discover as their cute little puppy grows it tends to have an aggressive side. Dog aggression is a serious problem and professional assistance is recommended in helping correct the problem.

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Many owners discover as their cute little puppy grows it tends to have an aggressive side. Dog aggression is a serious problem and professional assistance is recommended in helping correct the problem.

Aggression comes in many forms, from territorial to dog-dog aggression. The root of aggression also can be caused by many factors and is mainly dependent upon the individual dog. Contrary to what many will say, many breeds are not naturally aggressive, they are either taught or it is isolated to particular dogs, not the breed.

With proper training and patience aggression can be overcome in a dog. Often a professional trainer is needed and it involves intense work on the owner’s behalf. Another popular choice for owners with dogs that have aggression problems is to seek the advice of a veterinary behaviorist. This is a veterinary that has completed additional coursework outside of the common veterinary school in the area of animal behavior. The main body governing this is the American College of Veterinary Behaviorist. For information about obtaining a referral for a veterinary behaviorist ask your regular vet or contact the college.

Learned aggression behavior is another problem as many owners do not take the time needed to correct aggressive behaviors when a dog is young. If items like chewing and nipping are not taken care of properly when the dog is young it could lead to problems later on. Nipping or play biting is often started in the puppy teething stage. Although a puppy does not do much harm when play biting, it is also establishing itself as the Alpha in the family. This behavior should be corrected and is a great opportunity to teach some basic commands. When the pup begins to bite, give it the “Sit” command and reward it when it complies. This turns the negative behavior into a positive one and is much more enjoyable for everyone.

Additional Resources

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